The Rise of Evidence-Based Psychiatry

Originally published on Scientific American's Guest Blog on February 28, 2017. On January 2, 1979, Dr. Rafael Osheroff was admitted to Chestnut Lodge, an inpatient psychiatric hospital in Maryland. Osheroff had a bustling nephrology practice. He was married with three children, two from a previous marriage. Everything had been going well except his mood. For … Continue reading The Rise of Evidence-Based Psychiatry

Should We Let Doctors-in-Training Be More Sleep Deprived?

Originally published on Scientific American's MIND blog on December 16, 2016. As a third year medical student I rotated through a sleep clinic. My job was to administer the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, a tool used to screen patients for sleep disorders. At the end of the day, I took the questionnaire myself and was shocked … Continue reading Should We Let Doctors-in-Training Be More Sleep Deprived?

How a Curious Condition Solved a Neuroscientific Mystery

Originally published on Scientific American MIND's Guest Blog on August 22, 2016.  Véalo en español After prepping for the day’s cases, “Mike Brennan,” a 63-year-old cardiology technician, sat down for his morning coffee and paper. On the front page, he discovered something troubling: he could no longer read. No matter how long he stared at … Continue reading How a Curious Condition Solved a Neuroscientific Mystery

A Study of Brains

Published on MuzeCollective.com on August 1, 2016. “Yeah, a ping—it’s like an electronic echo.” Drew explained, as his fingers weaved gracefully through his Gatsbian hair. “The ping tests the connection between the brain and computer: when I ping a brain and it pings back, I know the connection is good—cool, huh?” Becca smiled politely as … Continue reading A Study of Brains